The 5 Side Effects of Kindness

image: iStock photo

When we think of side effects the first thing that springs to mind are the side effects of drugs. But who’d have thought that kindness could have side effects too?

Well, it does! And positive ones at that.

1) Kindness Makes us Happier
When we do something kind for someone else, we feel good. On a spiritual level, many people feel that this is because it is the right thing to do and so we’re tapping into something deep and profound inside of us that says, ‘This is who I am.’

On a biochemical level, it is believed that the good feeling we get is due to elevated levels of the brain’s natural versions of morphine and heroin, which we know as endogenous opioids. They cause elevated levels of dopamine in the brain and so we get a natural high, often referred to as ‘Helper’s High’.

2) Kindness Is Good for the Heart
Acts of kindness are often accompanied by emotional warmth. Emotional warmth produces the hormone, oxytocin, in the brain and throughout the body. Of recent interest is its significant role in the cardiovascular system.

Oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide in blood vessels, which dilates (expands) the blood vessels. This reduces blood pressure and therefore oxytocin is known as a ‘cardioprotective’ hormone because it protects the heart (by lowering blood pressure). The key is that acts kindness can produce oxytocin and therefore kindness can be said to be cardioprotective.

3) Kindness Slows Ageing
Ageing on a biochemical level is a combination of many things, but two culprits that speed the process are Free Radicals and Inflammation, both of which result from making unhealthy lifestyle choices.

But remarkable research now shows that oxytocin (that we produce through emotional warmth) reduces levels of free radicals and inflammation in the cardiovascular system and so slows ageing at source. Incidentally these two culprits also play a major role in heart disease so this is also another reason why kindness is good for the heart.

There have also been suggestions in the scientific journals of the strong link between compassion and the activity of the vagus nerve. The vagus nerve, as well as regulating heart rate, also controls inflammation levels in the body. One study that used the Tibetan Buddhist’s ‘Loving Kindness Compassion’ meditation found that kindness and compassion did, in fact, reduce inflammation in the body, mostly likely due to its effects on the vagus nerve.

4) Kindness Improves Relationships
This is one of the most obvious points. We all know that we like people who show us kindness. This is because kindness reduces the emotional distance between two people and so we feel more ‘bonded’. It’s something that is so strong in us that it’s actually a genetic thing. We are wired for kindness.

Our evolutionary ancestors had to learn to cooperate with one another. The stronger the emotional bonds within groups, the greater were the chances of survival and so ‘kindness genes’ were etched into the human genome.

So today when we are kind to each other we feel a connection and new relationships are forged, or existing ones strengthened.

5) Kindness is Contagious
When we’re kind we inspire others to be kind and studies show that it actually creates a ripple effect that spreads outwards to our friends’ friends’ friends – to 3-degrees of separation. Just as a pebble creates waves when it is dropped in a pond, so acts of kindness ripple outwards touching others’ lives and inspiring kindness everywhere the wave goes.

A study reported than an anonymous 28-year-old person walked into a clinic and donated a kidney. It set off a ‘pay it forward’ type ripple effect where the spouses or other family members of recipients of a kidney donated one of theirs to someone else in need. The ‘domino effect’, as it was called in the New England Journal of Medicine report, spanned the length and breadth of the United States of America, where 10 people received a new kidney as a consequence of that anonymous donor.

******
References

5 side effects jacket imageReferences to all studies can be found in David R Hamilton, PhD., ‘The Five Side Effects of Kindness‘ (Hay House, February 2017).

For live online talks covering kindness, the mind-body connection, self esteem, plus life and spiritual, check out my Personal Development Club.

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133 Comments

  1. […] can lift the mood. But studies have also shown that kind acts have a positive impact on our health. Dr David Hamilton explains that being kind can reduce blood pressure, make our hearts healthier and even slow the […]

  2. National Nest Box Week | breathingrelief on March 14, 2012 at 4:06 pm

    […] his article : the 5 side effects of kindness and take a moment to consider how one simple action on your part could not only affect a number of […]

  3. […] The 5 Side-Effects of Kindness […]

  4. […] According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness create an emotional warmth, which releases a hormone known as oxytocin. Oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide, which dilates the blood vessels. This reduces blood pressure and, therefore, oxytocin is known as a “cardioprotective” hormone. It protects the heart by lowering blood pressure. [3] […]

  5. […] Menurut  Dr. David R. Hamilton, ketika kita melakukan sesuatu yang baik untuk orang lain, kita merasa senang. Dari segi biokimia diyakini bahwa perasaan senang yang kita dapatkan adalah karena peningkatan kadar morfin dan heroin alamiah dalam otak, yang disebut opioid endogen. Mereka menyebabkan peningkatan kadar dopamin dalam otak sehingga kita merasakan kegembiraan alami. Itulah mengapa perbuatan baik membuat kita lebih bahagia. Tindakan kebaikan umumnya disertai dengan kehangatan emosional. Kehangatan emosional menghasilkan hormon oksitosin, di otak dan di seluruh tubuh. Oksitosin menyebabkan pelepasan bahan kimia yang disebut oksida nitrat dalam pembuluh darah, yang melebarkan pembuluh darah. Hal ini mengurangi tekanan darah dan karena itu oksitosin dikenal sebagai hormon ‘kardioprotektif’ karena melindungi jantung (dengan menurunkan tekanan darah). Kuncinya adalah bahwa tindakan kebaikan dapat menghasilkan oksitosin dan karena itu kebaikan dikatakan melidungi jantung. Oksitosin dikenal juga sebagai hormon kedermawanan, katalisator silaturahmi, pembangkit ukhuwah. […]

  6. […] According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness create an emotional warmth, which releases a hormone known as oxytocin. Oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide, which dilates the blood vessels. This reduces blood pressure and, therefore, oxytocin is known as a “cardioprotective” hormone. It protects the heart by lowering blood pressure. [3] […]

  7. […] to Dr David R Hamilton, a hormone called Oxytocin is released when we commit acts of kindness, reducing our blood pressure […]

  8. 11/13/14 – World Kindness Day | City Kindness on November 13, 2014 at 1:27 pm

    […] to feel more comfortable in difficult situations and ultimately make them feel better. According to Doctor David R. Hamilton, Ph.D, author of Why Kindness is Good for You, there are five main positive side effects of […]

  9. 7 Ways to Love Yourself Without the Narcissism on November 29, 2014 at 3:12 pm

    […] Studies have shown that sending someone an thank you email or card, an appreciative phone-call, giving up your seat on the bus, or paying for someone’s coffee, releases the feel-good chemicals dopamine and oxytocin—for the recipient and giver. […]

  10. […] Studies have shown that sending someone a thank-you email or card, an appreciative phone call, giving up your seat on the bus, or paying for someone’s coffee, releases the feel-good chemicals dopamine and oxytocin — for the recipient and for the giver. […]

  11. […] Studies have shown that sending someone a thank-you email or card, an appreciative phone call, giving up your seat on the bus, or paying for someone’s coffee, releases the feel-good chemicals dopamine and oxytocin — for the recipient and for the giver. […]

  12. […] But hear me out. Doing your best to be kind to people will help you out and make your life better. You’ll be happier with […]

  13. Parent CUE on February 12, 2015 at 4:22 pm

    […] qualities, makes you not only happy, but it also makes you healthy. According to one scientist, David Hamilton, kindness changes the brain, impacts the heart and immune system, and may even be an antidote to […]

  14. […] to Dr David Hamilton, these are the 5 side effects of […]

  15. […] when we serve someone, it also just feels good. Our brains literally produce the natural versions of morphine or […]

  16. Random Acts of Kindness - The Wellness Report on October 22, 2015 at 4:25 pm

    […] on May 30, 2011 by David R. Hamilton PhD Retrieved […]

  17. BE GENEROUS | One Minute Dawah on November 8, 2015 at 2:08 am

    […] goodness are more likely to lead a longer and healthier life (more information on this can be found here); which is the more reason you should start your generosity project […]

  18. […] Dr. Hamilton sums up The Five Side Effects of Kindness here: http://drdavidhamilton.com/the-5-side-effects-of-kindness/ […]

  19. […] Emotion can trigger sympathetic responses in the brain, even when unconsciously so. For example, acts of kindness, humaneness, and charity, trigger in the brain the same systems as if those witnessing the act did the act themselves. […]

  20. […] Emotion can trigger sympathetic responses in the brain, even when unconsciously so. For example, acts of kindness, humaneness, and charity, trigger in the brain the same systems as if those witnessing the act did the act themselves. […]

  21. […] Emotion can trigger sympathetic responses in the brain, even when unconsciously so. For example, acts of kindness, humaneness, and charity, trigger in the brain the same systems as if those witnessing the act did the act themselves. […]

  22. Kindness | The Book Thief on December 3, 2015 at 6:59 pm

    […] Kindness brings in well being. It also enhances mindfulness. Being kind helps us remember the little things in life. Remembering those little things aid in understanding that they make up the big things and that they aren’t separate. […]

  23. […] your own sense of well-being and significance, you can gain an immediate hit of the feel good oxytocin. Here is a crowd funding site I’ve created for the Magarini Children Center, in Kenya, […]

  24. random acts of kindness on December 29, 2015 at 3:34 am

    […] According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness create an emotional warmth, which releases a hormone known as oxytocin. Oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide, which dilates the blood vessels. This reduces blood pressure and, therefore, oxytocin is known as a “cardioprotective” hormone. It protects the heart by lowering blood pressure. […]

  25. […] David Hamilton says doing a kindness makes people like you & feel closer to you. Doing more kind things over time then helps you create new connections with people you don’t […]

  26. […] studies and research is starting to show that the more you practice kindness, the more you are enhancing the welfare of […]

  27. […] Latest studies and research is starting to show that the more you practice kindness, the more you are enhancing the welfare of others and you can start to feel less lonely in yourself. Not only that but involving yourself in acts of kindness can result in stronger immune systems, less aches and pains and less depression. Doing volunteering work has even shown to strengthen cardiovascular systems. It seems the knowledge of doing something good for others without getting anything back from it is a really huge boost to our health, in both mind and body. […]

  28. […] of kindness can lower blood pressure. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional warmth that we get from being kind releases a hormone known as oxytocin. This hormone […]

  29. the fruit — post 5 | Post-Its and Sharpies on February 28, 2016 at 2:58 pm

    […] in the act of giving.  I was reading an interesting article by a Dr David Hamilton who suggests five side effects of kindness, 1)Kindness makes us happier, 2) Kindness gives us healthier hearts, 3) Kindness slows ageing, 4) […]

  30. Sherry Knight on March 30, 2016 at 8:44 pm

    Loved this! <3 Thanks for sharing 🙂

    • David R. Hamilton PhD on April 8, 2016 at 2:51 pm

      Thanks Sherry. 🙂

  31. Annotated Bibliography – hannahsugerman on April 19, 2016 at 1:27 am

    […] David R. Hamilton PhD, 2016, 5 Side Effects of Kindness, David R Hamilton PHD: Using Science to Inspire, Viewed on 16 April 2016, <http://drdavidhamilton.com/the-5-side-effects-of-kindness/&gt; […]

  32. […] there are cardiovascular advantages: according to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness release oxytocin, a hormone which protects the heart by lowering blood pressure, […]

  33. […] there are cardiovascular advantages: according to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness release oxytocin, a hormone which protects the heart by lowering blood pressure, […]

  34. […] are some notable things I found regarding the science of […]

  35. […] have shown there are very real physical rewards for kindness, such as reducing social anxiety, lowering blood pressure, and even recharging our gut […]

  36. […] have shown there are very real physical rewards for kindness, such as reducing social anxiety, lowering blood pressure, and even recharging our gut […]

  37. […] have shown there are very real physical rewards for kindness, such as reducing social anxiety, lowering blood pressure, and even recharging our gut […]

  38. […] This result looked interesting, http://drdavidhamilton.com/the-5-side-effects-of-kindness/ […]

  39. […] According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness create an emotional warmth, which releases a hormone known as oxytocin. Oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide, which dilates the blood vessels. This reduces blood pressure and, therefore, oxytocin is known as a “cardio-protective” hormone. It protects the heart by lowering blood pressure. […]

  40. […] are many reasons why being positive and kind matters. For our purposes for November, think about how you feel and respond when someone is critical of […]

  41. World Kindness Day – The Nut Factory on November 13, 2016 at 12:41 am

    […] There are also personal benefits to performing acts of kindness as David R Hamilton PHD explains in his article “The 5 Side Effects of Kindness” […]

  42. […] shows that kindness makes us happier, boosts our immune systems and improves our relationships by elevating our […]

  43. […] for someone else. It simply just pays off to do a kind act without expecting something in return. A recent scientific study reported that an anonymous 28-year-old person walked into a clinic and donated a kidney. It set off […]

  44. […] Just as a pebble creates waves when it is dropped in a pond, so acts of kindness ripple outwards touching others’ lives and inspiring kindness everywhere the wave goes.  Dr. David Hamilton […]

  45. […] Random Acts of Kindness are effective yet relatively easy ways to improve relationships in your homeschool (and, therefore, your family).  Usually free or at little cost, Random Acts of Kindness can benefit your health by reducing anxiety and blood pressure.  Dr. David Hamilton shares his findings on The 5 Side Effects of Kindness as: […]

  46. […] you feel emotional warmth, the hormone oxytocin is produced in the brain and throughout the body. This hormone is known as […]

  47. Raising a Kind Person – The Parent Hub on February 2, 2017 at 3:43 pm

    […] qualities, makes you not only happy, but it also makes you healthy. According to one scientist, David Hamilton, kindness changes the brain, impacts the heart and immune system, and may even be an antidote to […]

  48. Nora Hopkins on February 14, 2017 at 6:08 pm

    So useful for my Project! Thank you for all your help!

    • David R. Hamilton PhD on February 16, 2017 at 10:43 am

      I’m pleased it’s helpful, Nora. 🙂

  49. skylar miller on February 14, 2017 at 7:23 pm

    This has 5 side effects, but what about the side effects of when your moody, or upset.

    • David R. Hamilton PhD on February 16, 2017 at 10:43 am

      I don’t know much about side effects of being moody or upset, Skylar. I think that’s part of our humanness so I don’t believe there are any negative consequences. I believe the body has a health-bias towards kindness so when we’re kind we help the body be healthy in a number of different ways. 🙂

  50. […] small acts of kindness can make a big difference on a person’s outlook and general happiness. According to Dr. David Hamilton, performing acts of kindness creates a sort of emotional warmth that leads to the release of a […]

  51. […] House Ways to Celebrate Black History Month How Random Acts of Kindness Can Benefit Your Health The 5 Side Effects of Kindness 10 Reasons to Do Random Acts of Kindness […]

  52. Kindness: A New Year’s Commitment | Go-Gratitude on February 24, 2017 at 11:11 pm

    […] According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness create an emotional warmth, which releases a hormone known as oxytocin. Oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide, which dilates the blood vessels. This reduces blood pressure and, therefore, oxytocin is known as a “cardioprotective” hormone. It protects the heart by lowering blood pressure. This is just one reference in hundreds that attribute one of the factors of good health is kindness.  So, it seems to make sense, in addition to the positive affect on our emotions, that we commit to at least one random act of kindness a week! […]

  53. MN on February 28, 2017 at 1:42 am

    Very Helpful, thanks

  54. How Kindness Changes Us - BodiMojo on March 8, 2017 at 5:40 am

    […] the emotional distance between two people, making them both feel more bonded. In fact, the genetic connection to kindness is so strong in between humans that we are virtually “wired” for […]

  55. […] have shown there are very real physical rewards for kindness, such as reducing social anxiety, lowering blood pressure, and even recharging our gut […]

  56. […] The 5 Side Effects of Kindness […]

  57. […] Dr. David R Hamilton schreibt in seinem Buch The Five Side Effects of Random Kindness von einem besonders großen Act of Kindness, an dem sich dieser Domino-Effekt zeigt. Ein 28-Jähriger ging in eine Klinik und spendete anonym eine Niere. Viele der Familienmitglieder des Mannes, der dank dieser Organspende überleben konnte, spendeten ebenfalls eine Niere – so konnten, wie es im New England Journal of Medicine dokumentiert ist, in kurzer Zeit zehn Patienten in ganz Amerika eine neue Niere erhalten. Alles die Folge dieses einen ersten Spenders. […]

  58. […] [iii] Dr David Hamilton, The 5 Side Effects of Kindness […]

  59. mariechelle sun on August 20, 2017 at 1:41 am

    wow my mom loved this

  60. Ruby Chan on October 5, 2017 at 10:57 pm

    Thank you immensely for your excellent teaching and for generously sharing your amazing knowledge, which have positively transformed so many people’s lives. My friends and I were incredibly impressed for your outstanding presentation on 1 October 2017, at the Hay House “I Can Do It” Event. –

    • David R. Hamilton PhD on October 16, 2017 at 9:53 am

      Thanks for your kind words, Ruby. 🙂

  61. Stephanie on October 26, 2017 at 11:24 am

    I’m feeling super blessed right now! I awoke this AM w/ an unusual & unrelenting need to post words of kindness all on FB & to also challanged (in a not so obv. way) ppl to choose kindness and not only lift others up but also reap the many physical, mental, & emotional benefits being kind has to offer to the ‘givers’ of kindness.
    Prior to hitting ‘POST’ I quickly checked the neurophys effects re:to kindness on our brains & the correct name of the biochemical released in our brains, ( I was correct, but kept second guessing myself between dopamine and serotonin). It was during my quick ‘research’ when I incidentally stumbled upon this article, and as I’m typing this comment I can’t help but to think…”it was a ‘God thing’ “. Thank You for sharing. Thank You for spreading smiles, joy, warmth & kindness; May the ripple continue! Have a Blessed day!

    I would like to say something in response to Sherry Knights question regarding the side effects of being upset or moody, while I’m not a doctor, I am a medical professional. I have been fascinated by our beautiful brains for as long as I can remember and I’m constantly reading, studing, researching…etc. all things brain… I don’t totally disagree with your answer to Sherry re:to her question about possible side effects of being moody and/or upset, but, to be clear, I do think it’s important to note that these moods, IF handled appropriately, (ie: addressed quickly & expressed in a healthy manner), ‘shouldn’t’ have neg side effects, however, when ppl don’t address these issues timely, appropriately, and in a healthy manner (ie: not addressing source of frustration, “bottling up” emotions, exploding, or ‘carrying’ “it” with you), all of which MOST DEFINITELY have negative side effects on our physical, mental, and emotional well-being, many of them.

    Just my opinion, gained through self-taught knowledge and life experiences.

    Have a great day!

  62. […] (source Dr David Hamilton) […]

  63. It all began with a simple “thank you”. on November 22, 2017 at 4:12 am

    […] Not only do we have a lot to be thankful for we can also benefit from positive effects of gratitude. Gratitude is “the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness.” According to research by David R Hamilton, PhD, who has an honors degree in biological and medicinal chemistry, a PhD in organic chemistry and has spent several years as a scientist in the pharmaceutical industry claims there are five different side effects of kindness.  Did you know that it not only makes us happier it is also good for the heart, slows ageing, improves relationships and it’s contagious? Pretty spectacular hey! To read more about David R Hamilton’s finding on kindness here. […]

  64. Giving Back This Holiday Season - Unsafe Foods on December 13, 2017 at 4:22 pm

    […] “According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness create emotional warmth, which releases a hormone known as oxytocin. Oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide, which dilates the blood vessels. This reduces blood pressure and, therefore, oxytocin is known as a “cardio protective” hormone. It protects the heart by lowering blood pressure.” In addition, random or even purposeful acts of kindness raise energy levels, increase serotonin levels, and reduce the production of cortisol (the stress hormone).  Stephen Post of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine found that when we give of ourselves, everything from life satisfaction to self-realization and physical health is significantly improved. Mortality is delayed, depression is reduced and well-being and good fortune are increased. […]

  65. […] thanks to Mr. Hamilton’s book, we have proof. He outlines all five “side effects” here, but suffice it to say there are physical and physiological benefits to kindness. Not to mention […]

  66. The Kindness Movement on December 28, 2017 at 12:35 am

    […] “Effects of kindness” uncovers more than twice that number, including a scientific study, “The Five Beneficial Effects of Kindness.” These include greater happiness, improved heart health, slower aging, better relationships – […]

  67. Lily on December 31, 2017 at 12:22 am

    Thank you for your meaningful and important work Dr. Hamilton. This type of discussion, in my opinion, is exactly what the world needs right now. When there appears to be so much polarization in our country it’s a reminder that we all need and want the same thing. Just a little Love and kindkindness can go a long way. I’m old enough to remember when it was very common to see bumper stickers that said “practice random acts of kindness”.

    • David R. Hamilton PhD on January 3, 2018 at 6:16 pm

      Thanks so much for your kind words, Lily. 🙂

  68. […] on May 30, 2011 by David R. Hamilton […]

  69. Jojo on January 27, 2018 at 3:59 pm

    I’m reading your book! It’s amazing to me that being kind can increase our longevity and can be a physically protective factor, not just the obvious result of strengthening relationships. Really impressed with your work! And I love Robert Holden, going to see him in May. Just love the transformative knowledge that you are both sharing!!!

    • David R. Hamilton PhD on January 30, 2018 at 12:31 pm

      Thanks for your kind words, Jojo. Your kindness made me smile. 🙂 I totally agree, re: Robert Holden. One of the best speakers I’ve ever heard. 🙂

  70. […] come after, there is an abundance of benefits to being kind and they’re scientific. Dr. David R Hamilton Ph.D. is using is using science to inspire. While being kind an help us be happier, practicing loving […]

  71. […] afterwards felt stronger, extra energetic, calmer, much less depressed and had greater self-worth. Dr. David R. Hamilton notes that kindness releases oxytocin hormone, which dilates the blood vessels, reduces blood […]

  72. […] The 4 side-effects of kindness: it makes you happier, boosts heart health, slows down aging and it’s also contagious. […]

  73. Jose I Martinez on April 2, 2018 at 9:39 pm

    Hi: I am working on a project where I would like to classify differe levels of kind people based on the “amount” of kindness based on volunteer work.

    Are there already levels of kindness? I want to be able rl label the person based on the amount of kindness provided, not so much in the quality of kindness.

    • David R. Hamilton PhD on April 6, 2018 at 8:27 am

      Hi Jose, I’m not sure if levels of kindness have been used. However, I’d recommend Allan Luks’s book, ‘The Healing Power of Doing Good’. His original research quantified the number of hours of volunteer work people did and correlated it with happiness. He surveyed over 3,000 people who did volunteer work and concluded that 95% of people reported it making them feel happier. There might be some things in his research that are useful to you. I hope that helps. 🙂

  74. […] tasks if you’re not too busy. Give up your seat on the bus to an old lady. These random acts will make you feel good and keep you in a positive state of […]

  75. Amanda on May 29, 2018 at 12:01 am

    I’m doing a project on a kindness project and its side effects on others and everyone surrounding them. Thanks, this helped so much for me and will probably stick with me for a while.

    • David R. Hamilton PhD on June 29, 2018 at 3:14 pm

      🙂

  76. […] releases the hormone oxytocin. According to Dr. David Hamilton, “oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide in blood vessels, which dilates […]

  77. Virender Kumar batra on October 30, 2018 at 9:46 am

    I am glad to know that kindness can give to us health,wealth,happiness, can fulfill our dreams. thank you God, you are wonderful, very, very kind to all.

  78. […] One of the side-effects of this happy hormone is that it lowers our blood pressure and even protects our hearts. So doing good, does us good […]

  79. proxy on December 4, 2018 at 6:27 pm

    Hello,I read your blog named “The 5 Side Effects of Kindness | David R Hamilton PhD” like every week.Your story-telling style is awesome, keep doing what you’re doing! And you can look our website about proxy.

  80. […] enhances your well-being. Spreading kindness actually improves your health, both physically and mentally. It does all kinds of things to your body to make you “feel good” […]

  81. […] enhances your well-being. Spreading kindness actually improves your health, both physically and mentally. It does all kinds of things to your body to make you “feel good” […]

  82. Patricia on January 6, 2019 at 2:34 am

    I stumbled across this article and after I read #1, and the feeling of a natural release of opioids, I reflected back to the other day when I didn’t know what, who or how was that? LOVE, GOD, KINDNESS, BLESSED, COMFORT. . . I was sitting in my car in a parking lot and saw this group of people putting groceries in a car. I saw all of them at one time or another separately. I realised that they were all together. With each passing of them in the store, it was obvious that money was tight and choices were being added and exchanged for other needs. I never get extra cash with my debit card but, I DID THIS TIME. No intentions at the time. Staring out at each one of them, there was a baby, a very deformed older women, one man and two other women all trying to get into there small car. I jumped out of the car and as I walked up to them they started turning around to me. The first person closest to me was the deformed women. I looked at her and placed a $20 bill in her hand and told her I want you to have this. The whole group was so appreciative and showed it to me graciously. I got in my car and drove off and I felt this overwhelming warmth of my heart like it was filling up and it felt so good that I came to tears. I thought I love this feeling of a random act of kindness and googled about the physical effects of RAOK. You explained it. Jokingly in my mind was that I do a RAOK everyday in one way or another but, that dose was stronger than I have felt in a long time and I want more. Can you accidentally overdose from it?

  83. Kindness for your health and well-being. on January 15, 2019 at 1:47 pm

    […] Hamilton, David R. “The 5 Side Effects of Kindness.” David R Hamilton PhD, 16 Nov. 2017, http://drdavidhamilton.com/the-5-side-effects-of-kindness/. […]

  84. […] after serving to others. Committing acts of kindness even lowers your blood strain: In line with Dr. David R. Hamilton, creator of The 5 Facet Results of Kindness, acts of kindness launch the hormone oxytocin. […]

  85. […] helping others. Committing acts of kindness even lowers your blood pressure: According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, author of The 5 Side Effects of Kindness, acts of kindness release the hormone oxytocin. […]

  86. Kevin Cheung on March 5, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    Thank you for your helpful article Dr. Hamilton. Although I have known that kindness has many benefits, but your detailed and scientific induction makes me deeply aware. Such rigorous induction is amazing!

  87. […] Pressure:  According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, engaging in acts of kindness creates emotional warmth, which releases a hormone known as oxytocin. […]

  88. […] on May 30, 2011 by @David R. Hamilton PhD #The 5 Side Effects of […]

  89. Anna on April 2, 2019 at 5:57 pm

    I believe kindness DEFINITELY leads to all these benefits. Can you please do a study on why some people react so negatively to kindness. Being kind is very important and Jesus Christ told his followers to love one another above all else. However, kind people re truly spat upon by society and taken as “manipulative” and disingenuous. Some people honestly treat kindness as if it is some kind of deadly disease, making it nearly impossible to continue being kind to them. Why is that? I truly don’t get people who HATE kind people.

  90. Post on June 26, 2019 at 3:13 pm

    […] acts of kindness lowers blood pressure. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, acts of kindness create emotional warmth, which releases a hormone known as oxytocin. Oxytocin […]

  91. […] Kindness is contagious. Plus, compassion slows the aging process by reducing inflammation in the body. (Dr. David Hamilton) […]

  92. Be Kind At Work - UTS Careers on July 9, 2019 at 9:09 pm

    […] all kinds of good things to happen within the body and the mind. In PhD David Hamilton’s book, The 5 Side Effects of Kindness,  it is stated that the effects of kindness are felt daily throughout our nervous systems and that […]

  93. […]  According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, being kind causes emotional warmth, which produces the hormone known as oxytocin in the brain and body. When you release oxytocin, a chemical known as nitric oxide is released into the blood vessels, which makes them expand and lowers your blood pressure.  […]

  94. Katherine Littlewood on October 10, 2019 at 6:46 am

    Hi David, I was at the Fanatics event yesterday and really enjoyed hearing you speak. It was part of a great day for the company. Your words were inspiring and I learnt so much. Hoping we can all be a little bit kinder to each other today and every day. Katherine

  95. […] of life. When you are good to others or help others, it also helps you reap the benefits of being kind. Biologically, it releases a hormone known as Oxytocin that is associated with expanding the blood […]

  96. […] I love the last one because it has a great potential for doing good. Dr Hamilton explains how when we are kind, we often create a chain. From his article: […]

  97. peppa on January 28, 2020 at 7:59 pm

    i think this artical was so exiting i love learning about kindness at my sons school it is kindness week…………………………………………………………………………………..

  98. […] Dr. David R Hamilton schreibt in seinem Buch „The Five Side Effects of Random Kindness“ von einem besonders großen Act of Kindness, an dem sich dieser Domino-Effekt zeigt. Ein 28-Jähriger ging in eine Klinik und spendete anonym eine Niere. Viele der Familienmitglieder des Mannes, der dank dieser Organspende überleben konnte, spendeten ebenfalls eine Niere – so konnten, wie es im New England Journal of Medicine dokumentiert ist, in kurzer Zeit zehn Patienten in ganz Amerika eine neue Niere erhalten. Alles die Folge dieses einen ersten Spenders. […]

  99. […] physical health! Acts of kindness releases oxytocin and produces endorphins. Dr. David R. Hamilton shares that Oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide, which dilates the blood […]

  100. The Power Of Kindness ⋆ Shield Insurance Agency on February 17, 2020 at 5:13 pm

    […] kindness, reduces inflammation, and it can directly affect the chemical balance of your heart.  According to Dr. David Hamilton, “oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide in blood vessels, which dilates […]

  101. Random Acts of Kindness - Brightly on February 19, 2020 at 10:56 pm

    […] a bad week? Try being kind. “When we do something kind for someone else, we feel good,” said Dr. David Hamilton. “On a biochemical level, it is believed that the good feeling we get is due to elevated […]

  102. […] und gerade auch die Random Acts of Kindness können neben Deinem Gehirn auch die Welt verändern. Dr. David R Hamilton schreibt in seinem Buch „The Five Side Effects of Random Kindness“ von einem besonders großen […]

  103. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  104. Johnny on May 13, 2020 at 11:46 pm

    GOOD JOB!

  105. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  106. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  107. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  108. […] acts of compassion release oxytocin into the brain and body; also known as the love […]

  109. […] 1.References to studies can be found in David R Hamilton, PhD., ‘The Five Side Effects of Kindness‘ (Hay House, February 2017). http://drdavidhamilton.com/the-5-side-effects-of-kindness/ […]

  110. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  111. […] Blood Pressure […]

  112. […] Blood Pressure […]

  113. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  114. […] releases the hormone oxytocin. According to Dr. David Hamilton, “oxytocin causes the release of a chemical called nitric oxide in blood vessels, which dilates […]

  115. Being Kind for a Happier World | happynesshub.com on February 10, 2021 at 11:55 am

    […] it is not only the body that is impacted by kindness – our minds are too. David’s book The Five Side Effects of Kindness explains how performing acts of kindness makes us happier. Doing something nice for another person […]

  116. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  117. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  118. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  119. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  120. […] a reason why kind people are known for having big hearts—literally. According to Dr. David R. Hamilton, the emotional reaction to acts of kindness release the hormone […]

  121. […] oxytocin – the “feel good” hormone –, which lowers blood pressure and protects your heart. Other positive side effects include slowing signs of ageing and making you […]

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